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Treevan Treevan 🇦🇺 @aussie.zone
Posts 1.3K
Comments 1.2K
E-scooter company to fit Melbourne fleet with AI cameras to stop riders using footpaths
  • So you are going to go on Mastodon and tell everyone to delete the tag that automatically propagates so you aren't @'d?

  • E-scooter company to fit Melbourne fleet with AI cameras to stop riders using footpaths
  • It can't be helped as it's coming from Mastodon. It automatically @'s.

  • Living in a ‘mass extinction’
  • Endemic vs climate change, who will win.

    Trying to recreate an actively collapsing biosphere may* be an exercise in futility.

    • results may vary

    In Australia, we call it "pre-clearing"; recreating the environment the day before the ships hit the beach. Climate change need not apply.

  • Living in a ‘mass extinction’
  • And I get downvotes for perhaps suggesting that planting only endemic natives isn't the smartest idea.

    I like your vision.

  • Hey Guys, Need your help !
  • I'm not an electrician but that insulator is doing absolutely nothing in a38wt0.jpg

    Do you have other electrical work to do?

    Supply is a 50:50 issue but I'm reasonably sure that once it crossed your property boundary, it's yours to maintain. @[email protected] is suggesting contacting power company to get the info you require from the source i.e. "Am I responsible for the maintenance of the supply to my house?". I tried to websearch for the definitive answer but the results are hard to trawl through (reddit would be better), I'm sure it's somewhere but search results are so shit these days.

    There is no disconnection required to repair, even if it snapped the wires and insulation would likely hold the line connected to your house (tree branch might tear it out) but no one would be electrocuted, so the electrician shouldn't need to contact energy company. You can "theoretically" grab those wires with your bare hands as they are insulated - DO NOT DO THIS though as there was a shoddy batch of insulation that broke down in the sun so the top of the wires are live.

    If you have other electrical work to do, try to get it all done in one visit. Since you have posted about this house regularly, get some networking cables and other stuff put in at the same time.

  • Baskethedge: Fight erosion with living structures
  • It's always the same anecdote.

    I'm sorry that you have to deal with Bradford Pear. It's something we don't deal with because we live in a different climate.

  • Baskethedge: Fight erosion with living structures
  • No, I'm 99.9% native work. Always have been.

    But we use one tool in the sub and tropics that is beyond anything else and hasn't "escaped" in 80 years of use.

  • Baskethedge: Fight erosion with living structures
  • Why?

    There are sterile exotics that work that are exceptional at this job, much better than natives.

    Stop being so black and white.

  • Question About Bamboo
  • A raised garden bed won't prevent the rhizomes from travelling, unless the bed is permanently sealed where it contacts, or near contacts, the ground. Remember that plastic can crack, split, and deform, concrete can crack also.

    If you know a plant is invasive and difficult to control at the best of times (unlike an invasive that can have seeds removed or similar), then have a long think about it. It's like playing catch with a live hand grenade; the safest way is not to play. Clumping bamboo is the only choice if your climate permits it.

    For me, on choosing what to plant, I would first consider that benefits me (food, flower, aesthetic, biomass) and that can be endemic, native, or exotic. If nothing suits that has a value, I would then choose a diverse small planting in endemic species to and around your area (also consider recommendations from climate scientists if you area will get warmer/colder/wetter/drier and select some species suited to that change).

  • BikeForums.net is a really helpful resource for almost any bike info
  • Change your location or even the server at your current one? I can access.

  • Did you know that wood ducks do not quack
  • Yes they do!

    Ohhhh, you were talking about YOUR "Wood Duck" and I likely live in another country and our "Wood Duck" is different. Wondered why the photo was off; "this person doesn't even know what a Australian Wood Duck looks like, what a flaming galah".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhoD-onynlI

  • How to join two PVC pipes securely for water under pressure.
  • The graphs in that link are decent. It's a significant increase in bonding and if you are under pressure, definitely do it.

    And I used to work with a plumber who used primer to set joints on fire to pull them apart again. Another use of primer that isn't on the label.

  • How to join two PVC pipes securely for water under pressure.
  • To put it in simple terms, the priming fluid sets up the PVC cement to do its job properly. The primer acts as a cleaner, removing grime as a PVC cleaner does, and it also softens the surface that it is applied on. PVC pipes are joined together through a change in their chemical composition.

    (High) Pressure it likely matters, you want a strong bond. Stormwater/downpipes, probably not.

    Not a plumber.

    I just did a quick websearch for both these answers, try a deep dive on some Reno forums or similar, find a plumber or chemical expert as to why it's important.

    Another one:

    https://redlib.perennialte.ch/r/Plumbing/comments/camh2c/is_pvc_primer_reeeeeally_necessary_when_youre/

    Quote:

    You may as well just silicone the pipes together.

    The primer softens the pipe to prep for the fusion process.

    Without primer the glue is essentially just a gap filler.

    That oatey cleaner you are talking about is for ABS pipe usually.

    ABS doesnt require a primer but is often suggested to use that cleaner prior to application.

    A link:

    https://www.plumbingsupply.com/the-great-pvc-primer-debate.html

  • How to join two PVC pipes securely for water under pressure.
  • Bostik PVC Pipe Cement Green - Type P (Pressure) Fast setting, high bond PVC pipe cement for use in Pressure applications.

    For bonding with PVC-U Pipes and PVC-U Fittings Suitable for pressure applications Suitable for use in contact with drinking water

    No additives of any kind shall be mixed with this solvent cement. Priming fluids shall be used to prepare the jointing surface prior to the solvent cement application.

  • Cattle are a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. Hawaiian seaweed could change that.
  • https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jul/13/seaweed-cow-feed-trial-fails-methane-reduction-australia

    One of the world’s longest commercial trials of a seaweed supplement that the global meat industry hopes could slash methane from beef cattle has recorded much lower reductions in the potent greenhouse gas than previous studies.

  • Windows 95 Guide w/ Jennifer Aniston and Matthew Perry
  • 'Open by Default' in app settings though I would have thought once you installed, it would have asked which app player you wanted to set as default. I always select 'Just Once' because sometimes popup player is preferred over video player or background.

    Hopefully pictures are self-explanatory.

    Note: Tubular is the sponsorblock fork of Newpipe.

  • phys.org Australia's tall, wet forests were not open and park-like when colonists arrived—and we shouldn't be burning them

    Some reports and popular books, such as Bill Gammage's Biggest Estate on Earth, have argued that extensive areas of Australia's forests were kept open through frequent burning by First Nations people. Advocates for widespread thinning and burning of these forests have relied on this belief. They arg...

    Australia's tall, wet forests were not open and park-like when colonists arrived—and we shouldn't be burning them

    Some reports and popular books, such as Bill Gammage's Biggest Estate on Earth, have argued that extensive areas of Australia's forests were kept open through frequent burning by First Nations people.

    A key question then is: what does the evidence say about what tall, wet forests actually looked like 250 years ago? The answer matters because it influences how these forests are managed.

    Our key conclusion is that these forests were not open or park-like-as was the case in some other vegetation types in Australia.

    The compelling evidence we compiled all indicates mountain ash forests were dense, wet environments, not open and park-like, at the time of British invasion.

    3

    Rare pic of blind mole captured in outback

    www.abc.net.au 'No April Fools joke!' Rare pic of blind mole captured in outback

    Most Australians will never have heard of the kakarratul, an elusive silky mole that burrows in the desert and has no eyes. Now a growing threat is shrinking its habitat.

    'No April Fools joke!' Rare pic of blind mole captured in outback

    Indigenous rangers in the Western Desert area of northern Western Australia recently spotted a small mole covered in silky golden hair, marking the second sighting in six months. The desert region is home to unique species adapted to the hot, dry environment. The rangers play a crucial role in monitoring and protecting these lesser-known desert species. Ecologists highlight the importance of documenting desert species, especially as climate change impacts their habitats. The rangers, like Lynette Wildridge, work tirelessly to track and protect these elusive animals, showcasing their dedication to conservation efforts in the remote desert landscapes.

    1

    Asbestos as "recovered fines" can also be sold in soil mixes. Why not give "structural soil" a go? It's just rocks, biochar, compost, and some minerals. No recovered wood pieces.

    More info and pictures: https://aus.social/@treevan/110293053188000541

    One recipe:

    [!up20szal1hh71.jpg](https://postimg.cc/w7v7rw6y)

    Articles:

    https://www.biochar-journal.org/en/ct/77-Planting-Urban-Trees-with-Biochar

    https://stockholmtreepits.co.uk/ - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341343983_Tree_Pits_with_Structural_Soils_-_Practice_Note_Version_12

    https://medium.com/carboculture/how-to-use-biochar-for-structured-soil-plant-beds-in-urban-areas-8a45108e799

    15
    phys.org Apex predators not a quick fix for restoring ecosystems, 20-year study finds

    A Colorado State University experiment spanning more than two decades has found that removal of apex predators from an ecosystem can create lasting changes that are not reversed after they return—at least, not for a very long time.

    Apex predators not a quick fix for restoring ecosystems, 20-year study finds

    A 20-year experiment conducted by Colorado State University researchers in Yellowstone National Park found that restoring apex predators like wolves was not a quick fix for ecosystems degraded by their absence. While wolf reintroduction lowered elk populations, willows and aspens did not recover as strongly as expected even after carnivore numbers rebounded naturally. Constructing fences and dams showed the importance of reducing browsing and increasing water access independently. The study challenges the idea that easily reversing food webs can undo lasting ecological changes.

    1
    www.smh.com.au Ghost forests: Australia’s snow gums under threat from climate change

    They are beloved trees in the Australian landscape, but snow gums face an existential threat.

    Ghost forests: Australia’s snow gums under threat from climate change

    This article discusses how climate change is threatening Australia's snow gum trees through more frequent and intense bushfires. Snow gums have not evolved to cope with higher fire frequencies and are struggling to recover after multiple fires in short succession. Researchers have found that over 90% of snow gum forests in Victoria have burned at least once since 2000, and 30% have burned 3-5 times since 1938. With less time between fires, the younger snow gums do not have enough time to mature and produce seeds, potentially leading to ecological collapse of snow gum woodlands. Experts are calling for more protection of remaining old-growth snow gum forests and a shift towards prioritizing ecological assets during bushfire seasons.

    0

    Federation with <0.19.1 Instances - updated by u/lodion

    Usually I post to slrpnk.net and they are currently on 0.18.5. None of my posts/comments (2 posts, 1 comment) are federating.

    Just letting you know if anyone here is posting to non-updated instances, it's possible they aren't going through. Yet completely possible they are. Who knows with this federation business.

    I'm going to go to the Winchester Engadine Maccas, grab a schooner shit my pants and wait for this to all blow over.

    17
    www.rewildingmag.com “How I'm Restoring Native Bush to Boost Biodiversity – and Hope”

    Silvia Pinca is removing invasive species and replanting native trees on her New Zealand land. Kiwi and other birds are already making themselves at home.

    “How I'm Restoring Native Bush to Boost Biodiversity – and Hope”

    Silvia Pinca purchased 80 acres of land in New Zealand that was previously used as a pine plantation. She is working to rewild the land by removing invasive species like pines, pampas grass, and banana passionfruit and replanting native trees and shrubs. So far she has removed over 32,000 pines and planted hundreds of native seedlings. Native birds are starting to return to the land to help with seed dispersal. Her long term goal is to restore the native forest ecosystem and create a nature reserve.

    0
    www.theguardian.com ‘Horrified’: Devon village in shock at felling of 100 ancient beech trees

    Outrage in Colaton Raleigh after trees felled by government agency without consulting community

    ‘Horrified’: Devon village in shock at felling of 100 ancient beech trees

    Residents of Colaton Raleigh village in Devon, England were upset after discovering that 100 ancient beech trees located on a conservation site had been felled without consulting the local community. The Forestry Commission approved an application by a local landowner to cut down the trees. Residents said the trees were an important part of the local heritage and habitat, and that it will take over 200 years for new trees to regrow. Experts said engaging local communities is important for conservation decisions.

    0
    yubanet.com Research Explores Capacity of Biochar to Combat Climate Change, Improve Forest Soils

    Researchers will conduct tests in the Six Rivers National Forest, treating each test site with a unique biochar mix.

    Research Explores Capacity of Biochar to Combat Climate Change, Improve Forest Soils

    https://now.humboldt.edu/news/research-explores-capacity-biochar-combat-climate-change-improve-forest-soils

    Researchers will conduct tests in the Six Rivers National Forest, treating each test site with a unique biochar mix that’s seeded with a native, pollinator-friendly plant mix to compare growth between test sites.

    They’ll measure changes in vegetation productivity, diversity, native species composition, soil carbon, nutrients, metals, bulk density, seasonal water availability, and microbial community composition over a five-year period.

    2
    www.rmit.edu.au Aussie innovation turns waste into energy ‘gold’

    New technology that turns waste into reusable goods for energy and agricultural applications is a step closer to commercialisation, following trials.

    Aussie innovation turns waste into energy ‘gold’

    The article discusses a new Australian innovation called PYROCO that uses high heat to turn waste like sewage sludge and food waste into a carbon-rich product called biochar. This process removes pathogens and can turn waste into resources like fertilizer or materials for batteries. The technology has undergone trials and shows promise to more sustainably manage waste. Researchers are now working to commercialize the technology.

    1

    When your Bush Snake Beans start growing in mostly straight gravel

    !

    A gravel wicking bed. The soil is 100% gravel by volume with 15% compost and biochar filling the gaps.

    3
    www.edo.org.au Ruling leaves koala populations exposed but door opens to further legal action - Environmental Defenders Office

    The North East Forests Alliance (NEFA) is calling for ministerial intervention to protect fire-affected habitat after a disappointing Land and Environment Court ruling today. [1]   On behalf of NEFA, EDO took the state government-owned logging company to court in August to stop it from log...

    Ruling leaves koala populations exposed but door opens to further legal action - Environmental Defenders Office

    The North East Forests Alliance is calling for ministerial intervention to protect fire-affected habitat after a disappointing Land and Environment Court ruling today.

    On behalf of NEFA, EDO took the state government-owned logging company to court in August to stop it from logging Braemar and Myrtle State Forests.

    "In court, Forestry Corporation argued the EPA could change logging rules whenever it considers it necessary. But Forestry Corp has frequently refused to accept the EPA's attempts to implement improved logging to reduce impacts in burnt forests and to reduce impacts on Koalas."

    "EDO Managing Lawyer Andrew Kwan said:"While the decision is disappointing, importantly the court ruled that it was open for NEFA to take the action.

    "We welcome confirmation for the first time that the community can take critical action in the court to protect native species in circumstances where the authority to log state forests is disputed."

    1

    Old Hedgerows are New Again as More Farmers Embrace Benefits (old video in body text)

    modernfarmer.com Old Hedgerows are New Again as More Farmers Embrace Benefits - Modern Farmer

    For centuries, hedgerows defined the boundaries of agriculture. A hedgerow can be made up of any densely planted growth bordering a field that is

    Old Hedgerows are New Again as More Farmers Embrace Benefits - Modern Farmer

    Some midwestern fields are still bordered by hedgerows, but most US farmers don't plant hedgerows and are skeptical of their benefits, worrying that they might introduce pests or predators to their farmland.

    North American farmers are also loath to reduce the size of their crop-producing land by adding a living border or to deal with potential difficulties when the hedgerows require maintenance.

    Even in the United Kingdom, hedgerows experienced a downturn in popularity as farmers moved towards more heavy equipment for working their fields and maintaining their boundaries.

    While US farmers have been slower to embrace hedgerows for their ecological benefits, the science of hedgerows as natural havens has become inarguable.

    A farmer looking to embrace the benefits of hedgerows as field boundaries first has to identify what kind of boundary they need.

    https://inv.vern.cc/watch?v=WoprVhpOKIk - Hedging (1942)

    5

    Wake up, new climate zones dropped

    https://www.npr.org/2023/11/17/1213600629/-it-feels-like-im-not-crazy-gardeners-arent-surprised-as-usda-updates-key-map

    https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/new-plant-hardiness-map-used-gardeners-nationwide-and-based-osu-climate-data-unveiled

    0
    www.abc.net.au Ferrero Group to rip out Australian hazelnut trees due to unsuitable climate

    The Italian company behind Ferrero Rocher and Nutella is giving up on its farm in southern NSW saying the long-term climate is not conducive to hazelnut farming.

    Ferrero Group to rip out Australian hazelnut trees due to unsuitable climate
    • Ferrero, the company behind Nutella, has decided to discontinue its hazelnut farming venture in Australia.
    • The venture, which was initially seen as a boost for the Australian hazelnut industry, has been deemed commercially unviable due to low hazelnut yields.
    • The decision was made based on factors such as return on investment and the current climatic and financial situations.
    • Buyers interested in the land would need to invest significantly in removing trees and preparing the land for new planting.
    • The failure of the venture highlights the need for hazelnut varieties that are better suited for warmer climates in Australia.
    1

    Collapse is nigh

    This is a future I don't want to live in.

    Seriously though, here's the article:

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-11-17/gloucester-dave-evans-bicentennial-trees-closed-wa-government/103118524

    • The Gloucester and Dave Evans Bicentennial Trees will be closed for the next 12 months
    • The state government has not ruled out permanently closing the trees for climbing
    • Climbing the 60-metre tall trees is a popular activity for tourists
    2
    theconversation.com 5 things we need to see in Australia's new nature laws

    A group of prominent environmental scientists devised this list of 5 things we must see in Australia’s new national environmental laws, if we are to avoid calamity and hasten recovery.

    5 things we need to see in Australia's new nature laws

    The federal government is reforming our national environmental law.

    How can we assess whether these new laws can prevent further species loss and habitat destruction?

    • Protection of sufficient and connected habitat must be central to Australia's national environmental law.

    • The new laws must state policy objectives such as no new extinctions and no actions that accelerate climate change.

    • It's essential ministers not only have regard for environmental standards but also follow them to the letter of the law.

    • Our national environment laws must make room for genuine Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders participation in how matters of cultural and environmental significance are managed.

    • Our new nature laws must interact with federal cultural heritage laws, which are also under reform.

    1

    Defending and Expanding the Urban Forest: Opposing unnecessary tree removal requests

    treenet.org Defending & Expanding the Urban Forest: Opposing unnecessary tree removal requests

    The removal of senescing trees or those which pose a genuine risk to health or property is part of professional urban tree management.

    Defending & Expanding the Urban Forest: Opposing unnecessary tree removal requests

    The removal of senescing trees or those which pose a genuine risk to health or property is part of professional urban tree management. However, there are many requests for tree removals that are not based on a genuine likelihood of injury or property damage, but rather on an unfounded fear of what might happen or where the tree is considered to be in the way of some other activity. Across Australia, about 97% of requests for tree removals made to local government authorities are ultimately approved. Such a high rate of approvals provides a threat to the fabric of the urban forest.

    In many instances, the removal of sound and healthy mature trees has unexpected costs and consequences. The loss of shade can have an effect on the temperature experienced within a dwelling over summer and this may have health consequences in terms of heat-related illnesses if the occupants are elderly. Swelling of reactive clay soils may be exacerbated by a tree removal, which can contribute to problems with footings and foundations and wind damage may also be greater after the removal of a tree than it was when the tree provided a filtering of and shelter from strong wind.

    Too often the consequences of removing safe and healthy trees are not fully considered when undertaking the cost-benefit analysis associated with any proposed tree removal. This brief paper provides a framework for decision-making that could be used in defending safe and healthy trees from removal and allows the identification of any unforeseen consequences from such removals.

    3
    www.abc.net.au Macadamias 'as rare as the Wollemi pine' get new national recovery plan

    A plan of action is adopted to help save the world's only wild macadamia plants from extinction.

    Macadamias 'as rare as the Wollemi pine' get new national recovery plan

    A new national recovery plan has been adopted to help save the world's only wild macadamia plants from extinction.

    Shock finding In 2019, Queensland researchers were shocked to discover the global macadamia industry may have originated from nuts from a single tree or a small number of trees taken from Queensland to Hawaii in the 19th century.

    "We reviewed the plan, and then it just got stuck in politics, and we've been anxiously lobbying to get the new plan approved because it really does guide our actions for conserving wild macadamias," Ms Bond said.

    The recovery plan notes that populations of wild macadamias on private land in Queensland are generally located where protective fencing and weed control would have little or no negative economic impact on the viability of farm enterprises.

    1